by Tina Weyland, Kirsten Hostetler, & Tina Hovekamp

An overview of IL assessment efforts:

Oakleaf, M. J., Association of College and Research Libraries., & American Library Association. (2010). The value of academic libraries: A comprehensive research review and report. Chicago, IL: Association of College and Research Libraries, American Library Association.  This review and report is intended to provide Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) leaders and the academic community with 1) a clear view of the current state of the literature on value of libraries within an institutional context, 2) suggestions for immediate “Next Steps” in the demonstration of academic library value, and 3) a “Research Agenda” for articulating academic library value.

Information Literacy Assessment Tools:

Blevens, C.L.  (2012).  Catching up with information literacy assessmentResources for program evaluation. College and Research Libraries, 72(2), 128-149. 

In an article that appeared in the November 2010, issue of C&RL News, Jennifer Jarson provided links to several [assessment tools].The goal of this article is to build on the assessment links Jarson provided. Her stated goal was to “guide readers to important resources for understanding information literacy and to provide tools for readers to advocate for information literacy’s place in higher education curricula.” In addition to the information on resources and tools, Jarson provided links to universities whose assessment tools were available for review on their Web sites. For this article, selected Web sites have been accessed and evaluated further. A handful of additional information resources have been profiled, including new Web sites that offer a variety of assessment tool formats.

List of sources addressing the effects of Information Literacy efforts:

Bell, S.J. (September, 2008). Keeping them enrolled: How academic libraries contribute to student retention. Library Issues: Briefings for Faculty and Administrators, 29(1), 1-4. 

The article focuses on the challenge for academic library administrators to contribute to student retention. It says that academic administrators are struggling hard to understand the factors affecting students’ retention on academic institutions. Accordingly, students’ decision to leave the college before graduation is influenced by a member of the faculty, another student or an advisor. Furthermore, academic libraries could potentially have an impact on student retention if a strong linkage between libraries and student retention can be made. The research found that libraries contribute to student retention. The plans on how libraries can create an impact on student retention are discussed.

Bowles-Terry, Melissa (2012).  Library instruction and academic success: A mixed-methods assessment of a library instruction program. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, 7(1).  

Library instruction seems to make the most difference to student success when it is repeated at different levels in the university curriculum, especially when it is offered in upper-level courses. Instruction librarians should differentiate between lower-division and upper-division learning objectives for students in order to create a more cohesive and non-repetitive information literacy curriculum.

Cook, Jean Marie (2014). A library credit course and student success rates: A longitudinal study. College and Research Libraries. (Anticipated Publication date: May 1, 2014). 

The University of West Georgia’s Ingram Library has offered a fifteen-week two-hour credit course since 1998. In a longitudinal study covering twelve years, the library analyzed the progression and graduation rates of over fifteen thousand students. Students who took the class during their undergraduate career were found to graduate at much higher rates than students who never took the class. The library examined students’ high school GPAs and aptitude test scores but were unable to account for the increase through any difference in pre-collegiate achievement.

Daugherty, Russo (2011). An assessment of the lasting effects of a stand-alone information literacy course: The students’ perspective. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37 (4), 319-326.

The authors wished to measure the degree to which a library information literacy course establishes a foundation for life-long learning. A web-based survey was administered to 2147 currently-matriculating Louisiana State University students who had taken the one-credit information literacy course, Library and Information Science (LIS) 1001 (Research Methods and Materials). Though the response rate was relatively low, the survey revealed clear evidence that students continue to use the materials and skills taught in the course throughout their college careers for both course work and personal research.

Emmons, M., & Wilkinson, F. C. (2011). The academic library impact on student persistence. College and Research Libraries, 72(2), 128-149.  

What impact does the academic library have on student persistence? This study explores the relationship between traditional library input and output measures of staff, collections, use, and services with fall-to-fall retention and six-year graduation rates at Association of Research Libraries member libraries. When controlling for race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status, a linear regression finds that a change in the ratio of library professional staff to students predicts a statistically significant positive relationship with both retention and graduation rates.

Fain, Margaret. (2011). Assessing information literacy skills development in first year students: A multi-year study. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(2), 109-119.

Assessment data from 5 years of a pretest/posttest with first-year students was analyzed using McNemar’s test. The results show that revisiting previous assessment data can identify significant changes in information literacy skill development.

Gross, Latham (2013). Addressing below proficient information literacy skills: Evaluating the efficacy of an evidence-based educational intervention, Library & Information Science Research, 35(3), 181-190.

Over the course of three years, an educational intervention was developed to teach information literacy (IL) skills, change perceptions of IL, and to recalibrate self views of the abilities of first year college students who demonstrate below proficient information literacy skills. The intervention is a modular workshop designed around the three-step analyze, search, evaluate (ASE) model of information literacy, which is easy to remember, easy to adapt to multiple instructional situations, and can provide a foundation for building information literacy skills. Summative evaluation of the intervention demonstrates that students who attend the workshop see an increase in skills and awareness of information literacy as a skill set. Increases in skills, however, were not sufficient to move participants into the proficient range. While workshop participants were able to reassess preworkshop skills, skills gained in the workshop did not result in recalibrated self-views of ability. Like the development of skills, the recalibration of self-assessments may require multiple exposures to information literacy instruction.

Haddow, G. (2013). Academic library use and student retention: A quantitative analysis. Library & Information Science Research, 35(2), 127-136.

A key component of Vincent Tinto’s model of retention is the importance of student integration in the academic institution. Library use can be regarded as a form of integration within such institutions. A quantitative approach was applied to demonstrate how institutional data can be combined to examine library use and retention at a single institution.

Hernon, P., Dugan, R.E. (2002). Developing an assessment plan for measuring student learning outcomes. In An Action Plan for Outcomes Assessment in Your Library (pp. 29-42). Chicago, IL: ALA.

This article summarizes best practices on how to establish an assessment program in an academic library using ACRL standards and the Mildred F. Sawyer Library at Suffolk University as a case study.

Hsieh, Ma Lei, Dawson, Patricia H., Carlin, Michael T. (2013). What five minutes in the classroom can do to uncover the basic information literacy skills of your college students: A multiyear assessment study. Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, 8(3), 34-57.

Librarians at Rider University attempted to discern the basic information literacy (IL) skills of students over a two year period (2009-2011). This study aims to explore the impact of one-session information literacy instruction on student acquisition of the information literacy skills of identifying information and accessing information using a pretest/post-test design at a single institution… The results defy a common assumption that students’ levels of IL proficiency correlate with their class years and the frequency of prior ILI in college. These findings fill a gap in the literature by supporting the anecdote that students do not retain or transfer their IL skills in the long term. The results raise an important question as to what can be done to help students more effectively learn and retain IL in college. The authors offer strategies to improve instruction and assessment, including experimenting with different pedagogies and creating different post-tests for spring 2012.

Hufford, J.R. (2013). A Review of the literature on assessment in academic and research libraries, 2005 to August 2011. Libraries and the Academy, 13(1), 5-35.

A review of the literature following a 2005 report from Commission on the Future of Higher Education. Important findings include: research/citation workshops at the University of Albany resulted in significantly improved understandings of the research process and reductions in plagiarism; semester-long collaborations between the library and biology departments at Indiana University showed student improvements in information literacy skills; further testing at IU showed a significant discrepancy between students’ options, self-assessments, and graded tests.

Hurst, Susan (Spring, 2007). Garbage in, Garbage out: The effect of library instruction on the quality of students’ term papers. Electronic Journal of Academic and Special Librarianship, 8(1). 

The authors report the results of a study which used citation analysis of students’ term papers to determine the effectiveness of a library instruction session.  The research was conducted during the 2004-2005 school year.  In each semester, two sections of the same class received a library instruction session, while the third section of the class did not.  Bibliographies of the students’ term papers were then examined to determine if the numbers and types of sources cited differed between the two groups.  Library instruction was determined to be effective, in that students receiving library instruction were significantly more likely to cite journal articles and other scholarly resources than those students not receiving the library instruction.

Julien, H., & Boon, S. (2004). Assessing instructional outcomes in Canadian academic libraries. Library & Information Science Research, 26(2), 121-139.

This article reports on a three-year study of information literacy instruction in Canadian academic libraries, focusing on the outcomes of instruction in terms of tests of information literacy skills and interviews with students that explored their experiences of information literacy instruction. Particular emphasis is given to investigating instructional effectiveness and assessing learning outcomes with respect to identifying those institutional and pedagogical factors that promote successful outcomes. Outcomes of instruction include positive cognitive, behavioral, and affective results. Further discussion explores how instruction contributed to students’ overall educational success and which factors characterize “success” in achieving those outcomes from the viewpoints of instructional librarians and from the perspectives of clients (i.e., students). These data provide a basis on which to advance instruction toward identifiable, positive outcomes for students in postsecondary institutions. An emphasis on such outcomes is essential if librarians are to justify devoting institutional resources to instructional activities.

Kirk, Jason, Vance, Rachel, Gardner, Justin (2012). Measuring the impact of library instruction on freshman success and persistence. Communications in Information Literacy, 6(1), 49-58.

This study examines the relationship between formal library instruction and undergraduate student performance and persistence in higher education. Researchers analyzed two years of academic and demographic data collected from first-time freshmen at Middle Tennessee State University in an attempt to quantify the effect of librarian-led one-shot classroom instruction on students’ grade point averages and their likelihood of returning to school for the sophomore year.

Lacy, M., & Chen, H. (2013). Rethinking library instruction: using learning-outcome based design to teach online search strategies. Journal of Information Literacy, 7(2), 126-148. 

Survey of 59 student respondents who participated in an outcomes-based one-shot instruction session. Researchers wanted to know if demographic information influenced student responses. No significant relationship was found between participants rating of their search experience and individual characteristics. There was a demonstrated relationship between student experience with the campus library and the formulation of search queries and the number of search queries employed. “These findings suggest the importance of students’ exposure to the library – both in terms of the library as a place and as a resource. The question of how to provide this exposure, when students seldom seek it, remains a major challenge for academic librarians.”

Maughan, P.D. (2001). Assessing information literacy among undergraduates: A discussion of the literature and the University of California–Berkeley assessment experience. College & Research Libraries, 62, 71-85.  

A series of surveys distributed to graduating seniors over the course of five years. The resounding conclusion from these surveys was that “students’ perceptions about their ability to gain access to information and conduct research exceeded their actual ability to do so.”

Mery, Yvonne, Newby, Jill, & Peng, Ke (2012). Performance-based assessment in an online course: Comparing different types of information literacy instruction. Libraries & the Academy, 12(3), 283-298.

This study investigates whether the type of instruction (a single face-to-face librarian-led instruction, instructor-led instruction, or an online IL course–the Online Research Lab) has an impact on student information literacy gains in a Freshman English Composition program. A performance-based assessment was carried out by analyzing bibliographies in a required controversy paper. Descriptive, correlation, and regression analysis showed that the type of instruction did impact the quality of the bibliographies. Students in the online IL course had higher quality bibliographies than those students who received a one-session face-to-face instruction.

Needham, G., Nurse, R., Parker, J., Scantlebury, N., & Dick, S. (2013). Can an excellent distance learning library service support student retention and how can we find out? Open Learning, 28(2), 135-140.

This paper outlines the efforts of staff at The Open University Library to embed their services and resources into the learning experience of their distance learners, and to aspire to find ways of demonstrating their contribution to student retention and achievement. While there is huge potential in the amount and range of data available, the challenge is to identify an appropriate model that allows The Open University Library to demonstrate how Library Services impacts on student retention, attainment and achievement.

Nelson Laird, T.F., & Kuh, G.D. (2005). Student experiences with information technology and their relationship to other aspects of student engagement. Research in Higher Education, 46(2), 211-233.  

Using data from the 2003 National Survey of Student Engagement, researchers found that participation in information and library-related activities (e.g.,  using the library website to find academic resources, asking librarians for help, etc.) were positively correlated with student engagement in other areas that the researchers labeled as “active and collaborative learning” (e.g., working with other students on class projects, working with other students outside of class, etc.), “student-faculty interactions” (e.g., discussing grades or assignments with faculty, talking about career plans with faculty, etc.), and “academic challenges” (e.g., working harder than students thought they could to meet an instructor’s standards, preparing two or more drafts of a paper before turning it in, etc.)

Orme, W.A. (2004). A study of the residual impact of the Texas Information Literacy Tutorial on the information-seeking ability of first-year college students. College & Research Libraries, 65(3), 205-215.  

A study on four groups of first-year students, each group receiving a different type of information literacy instruction. Results showed that online tutorials were just as effective as face-to-face instruction and could be used in larger-scale orientation sessions to avoid tapping limited library resources.

Pagowsky, N., & Hammond, J. (November 01, 2012). A programmatic approach: Systematically tying the library to student retention efforts on campus. College and Research Libraries News, 73(10), 582.  

The article discusses some opportunities which show how institutional initiatives can be leveraged for improving library impact on student persistence and retention in the U.S. The Naugatuck Valley Community College (NVCC) in Connecticut has imposed a mandatory library instruction sessions which gave its library staff the opportunity to assess the information literacy of new students. Improvement in student retention was identified by the Arizona Board of Regents as an important metric for state funding, with an objective to improve freshmenretention and increasing the six-year graduation rates.

Samson, Sue (2010). Information literacy learning outcomes and student success. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 36 (3), 202-210.

Information literacy learning outcomes of randomly selected first-year and capstone students were analyzed using an assessment instrument based on the ACRL competency standards. Statistically significant differences between student populations in the selective and relative use of information inform the library instruction program and apply to research and teaching libraries.

Seeber, K.P. (2013). Using assessment results to reinforce campus partnerships. College & Undergraduate Libraries, 20, 352-365.

In response to calls for accountability, academic libraries have increased their assessment efforts. Although the University Library at Colorado State University–Pueblo has been engaged in student learning outcome assessment for several years, it has recently expanded its system of evaluation to share the results of information literacy assessments with teaching faculty. This was done in an effort to demonstrate the value of library instruction to the faculty of a small, regional campus. Several benefits have been realized as a result of this move, including stronger partnerships with course instructors and other departments engaged in academic support.

Sheret, L., & Steele, J.A. (2013). Information literacy assessment: Keep it simple, keep it going. Reference & User Services Quarterly, 52(3), 208-215.

Survey of IL skills at Western State Colorado University showed a noticeable positive effect on student learning outcomes who received embedded instruction from librarians and revealed a cumulative benefit from exposing students to IL skills in any format in a variety of classes form year-to-year.

Soria, K.M., Fransen, J., & Nackerud, S. (2013). Library use and undergraduate student outcomes: New evidence for students’ retention and academic success. Libraries and the Academy, 13(2), 147-164.

Pre- and post-term assessments given following successful collaboration between faculty and librarian in developing assignments that promoted IL skills. Post-term assessment revealed that students’ self-rating of their own confidence levels increased from an average of “3” on 5-point Likert scale to “4,” with the biggest increase in confidence related to dealing with government and primary source materials. The increase in confidence in these types of sources correlated with the types of sources used in the students’ bibliographies.

Victor, P., Otto, J., & Mutschler, C. (2013). Assessment of library instruction on undergraduate student success in a documents-based research course: The benefits of librarian, archivist, and faculty collaboration. Collaborative Librarianship, 5(3), 154-176.

An examination of data in the 2011 fall term at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities showed significant differences in cumulative GPA between first-year students who used at least one library service compared to students who didn’t use any, as well as a significant association between library usage and students’ first to second semester retention…Four particular types of library resources were significantly and positively associated with students’ academic achievement: using the library workstations….accessing online databases, accessing electronic journals, and checking out books. Only two library activities were associated with students’ retention: enrollment in the Intro to Library Research Part 2 workshop and use of online databases.

Walsh, John (2013). The effects of targeted, connectivism-based information literacy instruction on Latino students information literacy skills and library usage behavior, University of Arizona.

This dissertation assessed the effect of the instruction on IL skills and library usage behavior of Latino community college students; found that “instructional efforts of the library are influencing student learning outcomes.”

Wang, Rui (2006). The lasting impact of a library credit course. portal: Libraries and the Academy 6(1), 79-92.

This study found that there were statistically significant differences in citation use and grades between students who took a library credit course and students who did not. The results of independent samples t-tests indicated that the student group that took a library credit course cited more scholarly resources, produced fewer incomplete citations, and received higher grades for its papers and courses. The data included 836 citations produced by 120 student papers and the students’ grades for their papers and courses in the fall of 2004. Additionally, the survey results revealed that the students’ acquisition of bibliographic research and citation skills was directly attributable to the library credit course, whereas their counterparts tended to rely on informal sources. The evidence supports the lasting impact of a library credit course on student learning.

Wong, Shun Han Rebekah, &Cmor, Dianne (2011). Measuring association between library instruction and graduation GPA. College and Research Libraries, 72, 464-473.  

Academic libraries devote considerable human resources in delivering library instruction programs. This study attempts to determine if these instructional efforts have any measurable effect on student performance in terms of overall grades. Library workshop attendance and graduation GPA of over 8,000 students was analyzed at Hong Kong Baptist University. It was found that, if more than one or two library workshops were offered to students within the course of their program, there was a higher tendency of workshop attendance having a positive impact on final GPA. The results indicate that library instruction has a direct correlation with student performance, but only if a certain minimum amount of instruction is provided.

The 8th annual ILAGO Information Literacy Summit will be held May 10, 2014 at Linn Benton Community College campus in Albany, OR.  The theme for this year’s IL Summit is “IL for Everyone.”

 

The Summit typically has 60-80 attendees who come from many areas of practice (higher ed, public, K-12) and are eager to hear new ideas and ways to approach information literacy. We invite you to submit proposals for panels, presentations, discussions on best practices, and other programs. 

 

We are particularly interested in presentations that focus on collaboration on information literacy between and within different types of libraries and groups, such as:

 

  • Partnerships between public libraries and K-20 schools
  • Collaboration between library and non-library faculty in academic and school libraries
  • Information literacy initiatives or programs to meet workforce needs
  • Ways to cross-fertilize to expand critical thinking and information literacies across K-20
  • Teaching IL with new tools, shared ILS/SUMMIT catalog

Programs should be designed to run for a total of 45 minutes including Q&A. 

 

Program proposals will be accepted until Monday, March 3, 2014.

 

Please submit your proposals here: ILAGO IL Summit Program Proposal

 

We look forward to seeing everyone, details on the schedule will follow soon.

 

Cheers,

Andrea Bullock

Reference & Instruction Librarian

Clark College

abullock@clark.edu

360-992-2

Sara Jameson from Oregon State University shared this link with the OWEAC list and I think some ILAGO members will also find it interesting:  http://wac.colostate.edu/atd/reading/jamieson.cfm. Sara uses Sandra Jamieson’s work with WR 121 instructors at OSU as a way to delve deeper into students’ struggles with reading comprehension and research.  

Thank you to Sara for sharing.
~Michele

The ILAGO Board will kick off the fall term with a face to face meeting to discuss all of the wonderful and exciting things in our world of Information Literacy! The meeting is open to all so please join us.

When: Friday, October 18, 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

Where: Portland Community College, Cascade Campus, Terrell Hall Room 112

Lunch: Bring your own or find a place to eat near campus.

Agenda:

9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.    Welcome and Introductions

9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.  Information Literacy in K-12. Guest: Susan Stone

11 a.m. – Noon               Revisiting the IL Sequence. Includes a discussion about how exactly to reframe ILAGO’s  approach, taking into consideration a more comprehensive cooperation that extends before and beyond the first two years of college writing, i.e. a K-20 approach.

Noon – 1 p.m.                Lunch – Brown Bag. We’ll plan to lunch with OWEAC.

1 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.         Tie-up any loose ends from conversation before lunch

1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.   Assessment – Rick Stoddart of OSU and Brian Greene, formerly of Columbia Gorge CC, led a work group on this topic at the last Summit in spring 2013. We want to continue this conversation to keep abreast of the myriad of changes in K-12 education and Higher Ed. This conversation includes the Common Core Standards, Articulation Compacts, and potential changes in the governing boards of the OUS system. All of these changes will impact how we approach IL instruction. Guest: Rick Stoddart

2:30 p.m. – 3 p.m.         Wrap-up and adjourn

IL Summit in Bend this Saturday,  April 20th. Here’s a few last minute reminders for those of you making the trip to Bend.

If you are driving on Friday night or Saturday morning, forecast for the passes looks good – no snow! (some rain, perhaps). Nevertheless, please drive carefully – we look forward to seeing ALL of you in Bend on Saturday. Weather forecast for Bend, by the way, is for a partly cloudy 57 degrees.

The Summit will take place in OSU Cascades Hall on the Central Oregon Community College campus. Map and directions may be found here. Free parking is available just across the street at the Barber Library parking lot. Registration begins at 8:30 with coffee and breakfast served.

If you are going to be in Bend Friday evening, you are welcome to join folks at McMenamin’s Old St.  Francis School. Festivities should be beginning around 4:30 and children are welcome.

We look forward to seeing you at the 2013 IL Summit!

Bryan Miyagishima, 2012-13 ILAGO Chair

The following proposal is supported by ACRL-OR and ACRL-WA and a steering committee is working to advance the project.

Goal

Create a NW regional ACRL Immersion Program in partnership with regional ACRL chapters, the Orbis Cascade Alliance, and other supporters.

Background

In April at the 2012 Oregon Library Association Conference the OLA Library Instruction Round Table sponsored the session “The ACRL Immersion experience- what’s in it for YOU?” a panel describing logistics and benefits of the Immersion Program. At the panel, it was suggested that a NW regional Immersion Program could be a viable opportunity for librarians who are unable to afford or attend a National Immersion.  It was also suggested that a regional Immersion Program would build a strong sense of community among the local professionals who share the experience. Attendees at the panel session showed support for the idea and on May 19, 2012, attendees of the 2012 Oregon Information Literacy Summit also showed strong support for a regional ACRL Immersion Program. Michele Burke is initiating this proposal that regional ACRL Chapters along with the Orbis Cascade Alliance partner on organizing and supporting a regional Immersion Program, and Susan Barnes Whyte, Library Director for Linfield College is a consulting expert and partner on this proposal. Susan was the 2009-2011 Co-Coordinator for the entire National Immersion Program and has been the lead faculty member for many regional Immersion Programs over the last 12 years. She has extensive experience in organizing Immersion Programs and has volunteered to work on the steering team for this project.


Overview of National ACRL Immersion

  • Cost for attending a National Immersion is generally about $1,400 plus travel
  • The tracks are not sequential, individuals apply for and attend whichever tracks fit best
  • What do the tracks mean? (Teacher, Intentional Teacher, Assessment, Program)
    • Teacher Track       focuses on individual development for those who are interested in enhancing,       refreshing, or extending their individual instruction skills (mostly       novice but could be a perfect fit, attendees are asked to come with a       class they are teaching)
    • Program Track       focuses on developing, integrating, and managing institutional and programmatic       information literacy programs
    • Intentional Teaching:       Reflective Practice to Improve Student Learning Track is intended for       the experienced academic librarian who wants to become more self-aware       and self-directed as a teacher (profound personal change, need at least 5       years teaching)
    • Assessment:       Demonstrating the Educational Value of the Academic Library Track is intended for librarians active in teaching and learning and those with  leadership roles for information literacy program development who want to improve their knowledge and practice of both classroom and program  assessment
  •  Where to learn more about National Immersion: http://www.ala.org/acrl/issues/infolit/professactivity/iil/immersion/programs

Considerations for a Regional Immersion Program

Generally a Classic Immersion Program is offered and may make the most sense according to Susan Barnes Whyte. Past regional Classic Immersion Programs offered the Teacher Track and the Program Track coordinated to last the same number of days with the faculty members (usually 5 instructors) teaching in both. Although there has not been a regional Assessment Program or Intentional Teacher Program, elements of these could be options and the regional Immersion Program could be tailored to fit local needs (see for example the current program for Cornell University).

Grant funding is a possibility. Washington state community colleges were awarded two LSTA grants to support a Classic Immersion Program with a follow-up (first in the summer of 2006 with a follow-up summer 2011). The LSTA grant allowed many community college librarians from all WA community colleges to attend the Teacher or Program Tracks and reduced the cost substantially for all attendees. Susan will discuss LSTA grant details with Deb Gilchrist and has proposed that we might work on a grant request together. For information on the WA program and links to information about the LSTA grant, see Dipping into ACRL Immersion: Advancing Information Literacy through Good Teaching and Program Design (http://informationliteracywactc.pbworks.com/w/page/39530288/Dipping%20into%20ACRL%20Immersion).

Action Items

  • Establish partnership with ACRL-WA, ACRL-OR, ACRL-ID and the Orbis Cascade Alliance
  • Form a steering team (Susan has offered to serve on the steering team and assist with logistics)
  • Decide which Immersion Program(s) to bring to the region (this decision must be made prior to contacting ACRL National Immersion and Susan recommends Classic Immersion)
  • Gather support for the regional Immersion (examples of support include financial sponsorship, a hosting organization, and housing)
  • Prior to approaching ACRL National, regional partners must be strongly organized and must have thought about funding in detail

ILAGO’s Fall general membership meeting is this Monday, November 19th at Pacific University in Forest Grove, from 1:00-5:00pm in the Schauermann Conference Room within the Library. (see announcement with agenda below).

Jen, the ILAGO Technology Officer, is arranging an option to attend virtually using GoogleHangouts. We haven’t used GoogleHangouts for this before, so fingers crossed!

 

GoogleHangout Instructions from Jen
____________________________________________________

You will need:

1. access to audio (mic + speakers or headset) or audio and video

2. a google account

Before the Meeting (ASAP):

  1. send your google account address to my gmail: jenklaud@gmail.com. I will reply to your message from my gmail account
  2. Add my gmail account (jenklaud@gmail.com) to a Google+ circle.

Day of the Meeting:
1. Login to your Google account. 2. Navigate to Google+. 3. Look for the “hangouts” icon on the left sidebar (may be under more). 4. You should see me, Jen,  “hanging out.” Join!
Email me (Jen) with any questions (jenklaud@gmail.com) jenklaud@gmail.com; on behalf of; Jen Klaudinyi klaudinyij@lanecc.edu

——————————————————————————————————————

ILAGO Meeting Announcement Hello ILAGO members,

I’d like to invite any interested members of the ILAGO list to our Fall meeting on November 19 in Forest Grove, sponsored by the Pacific University Library. We will be meeting from  1:00-5:00 in the Schauermann Conference Room within the Library. On the agenda:

– sharing of IL news and activities

– IL/Library advocacy

– review of the IL charter

– planning for the Spring IL Summit

Please feel free to share this invitation with others who you think might be interested.

While I’ve had a chance to chat over the phone and skype with some ILAGO folks over the past couple of weeks, it will be very nice to have some face-to-face conversation for once. I look forward to seeing you there!

Regards,

Bryan Miyagishima, Linn-Benton Community College Library, ILAGO Chair