Time to get social, everyone! We hope you can join colleagues attending the Oregon IL Summit 2017 for some pre-Summit mingling:

Friday, May 12th from 5-8pm
McMenamins Kennedy School
https://goo.gl/maps/GzYzxwH8pDu
5736 NE 33rd Ave, Portland, OR 97211
Some parking provided
Happy hour ends at 6pm

ALL are welcome! Please RSVP if you know you will be joining us. For those who are still working on schedules, we will have a group there and you can come by any time.

Ask for the ILAGO crew to find us inside the Courtyard Restaurant.
Hope to see you there!

Sara Robertson <sara.robertson@pcc.edu>
Lisa M Tegethoff <lisateg@uw.edu>

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Request for Input:
If you are considering attending the 2017 IL Summit, what types of workshops would you like to see? We are putting together a program that we hope will appeal to all library types, and your input will help us do that! Please complete the linked survey by clicking here.

Call for Proposals:

The IL Summit typically has 60-80 attendees who come from many areas of practice (higher ed, public, K-12) and are eager to hear new ideas and ways to approach information literacy. We invite you to submit proposals for panels, presentations, discussions on best practices, and other programs. While we will be highlighting assessment, all topics related to information literacy are welcome.

You can find the proposals submission form with more details here: http://tinyurl.com/zxvmuwz

Program proposals will be accepted until March 3rd, 2017

Sarah Ralston 
ILAGO Chair
Instruction Librarian
Pierce Library
Eastern Oregon University
sralston@eou.edu
(541) 962-3474

The 11th annual ILAGO Information Literacy Summit will be held Saturday, May 13, 2017 at Washington State University in Vancouver, WA.

Form to submit proposal: http://tinyurl.com/zxvmuwz

Assessment, the process by which we learn about the needs of our patrons in order to analyze how effective and useful library services are, provides us with the data to evaluate how well we are meeting that goal. It also provides us with the feedback we need to make purposeful adjustments to programs and services, and can even provide evidence of need to administration when proposing new programs and services. It encompasses a plethora of concepts such as: collaborative assessments, data management and visualization, metrics and indicators, methods and tools, organizational issues, teaching and learning, usability, user experience and more!

The IL Summit typically has 60-80 attendees who come from many areas of practice (higher ed, public, K-12) and are eager to hear new ideas and ways to approach information literacy. We invite you to submit proposals for panels, presentations, discussions on best practices, and other programs.

Programs should be designed to run for a total of 45 minutes including Q&A; longer programs/workshops will be considered on a case-by-case basis (if a longer program/workshop is desired, please include that in the Comments field).

Program proposals will be accepted until March 3rd, 2017

Form to submit proposal: http://tinyurl.com/zxvmuwz

The 10th annual ILAGO Information Literacy Summit will be held May 21, 2016 at the Central Oregon Community College campus in Bend, Oregon.
The theme for this year’s IL Summit is “Collaboration,” but we invite a variety of presentations related to information literacy. The theme of “Collaboration” could take many forms, including collaboration among different types of libraries/librarians (e.g. academic, public, school), across the curriculum, and/or examples of successful outreach and collaboration between librarians and external stakeholders. Though public, school, and academic libraries serve different populations, we still all have one goal in common: to provide support to our users in order to help them be successful. One way we can do this is through the collaborative relationships we build within our communities. When librarians are able to collaborate with teachers or instructors, and certainly with each other, students reap the benefits.
The IL Summit typically has 60-80 attendees who come from many areas of practice (higher ed, public, K-12) and are eager to hear new ideas and ways to approach information literacy. We invite you to submit proposals for panels, presentations, discussions on best practices, and other programs.
Programs should be designed to run for a total of 45 minutes including Q&A; longer programs/workshops will be considered on a case-by-case basis (if a longer program/workshop is desired, please include that in the Comments field).
Program proposals will be accepted until March 4, 2016.
Please submit your proposals here: ILAGO IL Summit Program Proposal
We look forward to hearing from you.
Lisa Tegethoff
ILAGO Chair 2015-2016
The 2016 Oregon Information Literacy Summit will be held Saturday, May 21, 2016 at the Central Oregon Community College campus in Bend, Oregon.
Interested in participating? We are looking for panelists who are willing to discuss their experience collaborating with others in the development, delivery, and assessment of information literacy skills in the classroom/library. Examples of these collaborations may be, but are not limited to, school librarians and English teachers, school librarians and academic librarians, public librarians and academic/school librarians, academic librarians and faculty members. Please contact me if you are interested in joining our panel!
Also, please keep an eye out for the request for proposals, which will be coming out soon.
We hope to see you there!

When: Friday, October 16, 2015 (chosen to correspond to the fall OWEAC meeting)

Where: Western Oregon University, Hamersly Library room HL 107

There will be a conference phone option for attending. 

The fall meeting is open to anyone.  

Research Supports School Librarians’ Impact on Student Learning

June 5, 2014

Changes in Oregon law and other trends point to the necessity of licensed school librarians and their positive impact on student learning. The passage of the Strong School Libraries Act, or Oregon House Bill 2586, means that school districts are required to account for “strong school library programs” in the continuous improvement plans (CIP) that they must submit to the Oregon Department of Education (ODE). A school district must show in its plan that it provides all students and staff in each school equitable access to:

 

A comprehensive library program which provides instruction in information literacy and research proficiencies, promotes integration of digital learning resources, advances reading engagement, and creates collaborative learning opportunities with teachers.

A professionally-developed and well-managed school library collection of current and diverse print and electronic resources that supports teaching and learning, college and career readiness, and reading engagement.

 

Licensed school librarians, sometimes referred to as library media specialists or teacher librarians, positively impact student reading, writing, and information literacy skills in K-12 education. Yet, their numbers have dropped at an alarming rate.

 

Data collected by the Oregon State Library in Salem show that the number of licensed school librarians in Oregon has dropped from 818 full-time equivalent in 1980 to only 144 in 2013. That is an 82% decrease. Conversely, the number of students per librarian has increased significantly. In 1980 there was one librarian per 547 students compared with almost 4,000 students per librarian in 2013. As a result, some students may never come in contact with a licensed school librarian during their K-12 years.

 

The sizeable drop in numbers runs counter to the impact of school librarians on learning. Numerous impact studies point to increased reading and writing test scores when a full-time licensed librarian is employed in schools. A 2012 report entitled Creating 21st Century Learners: A Report on Pennsylvania’s Schools found that both reading and writing test scores increase significantly when a full-time licensed librarian is employed at a school. Furthermore, students at a school with a full-time licensed librarian are nearly three times as likely to score an advanced score on the state’s standardized writing test. An Oregon study, Good Schools Have School Librarians, found that if staffing, collections, and funding of library media programs grow, reading scores rise.

 

As school districts recover from lean budget years, they will need to respond to the Strong School Libraries Act by strengthening their school library programs. In response to the need for more instructional support with the new Common Core Standards, some districts in Oregon are currently bringing back school librarian positions. Medford School District in southern Oregon recently posted three job openings for licensed school librarians. More positive changes like this one are needed in all areas of our state.

 

Ultimately, this issue has to be addressed locally. Community members and parents can play a role in this trend by working with school districts to raise awareness of the importance of strong school libraries. Specifically, they can ask questions about the staffing and programming in their child’s school library. For example, are the students in your neighborhood school served by a licensed school librarian? What information literacy and research instruction is your child receiving? Ask to review your school district’s response to the CIP. Does the library section match the program you know exists?
For more information about how you can get involved, contact Nancy Sullivan, Oregon Association of School Libraries President, at president@oasl.olaweb.org or Penny Hummel, Oregon Library Association President, at phummel.ola@gmail.com, or consult the OASL webpage on this topic (http://bit.ly/1hbxpOm).